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Pleasant and Delightful

A traditional pastoral folk song the popular form of which dates to the mid-19th century. It is largely believed to have been sung commonly during the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857, though no credible source seems to confirm it. If it were true the song likely predates the 19th century, though no published copies of the work exist.

As pointed out by the clever user Collapsing Hrung Disaster in the February 2020 stream, the lyrics to the pop song "Stacy's Mom" fit the tune of this with somewhat hilarious results.

Lyrics

These lyrics are based on the version performed by the Longest Johns on their livestreams. As the song is traditional and the lyrics vary greatly from singer to singer, linking to 'original lyrics' for this song is impossible.

It was pleasant and delightful on a midsummer's morn
When the green fields and the meadows were covered in corn;
And the blackbirds and thrushes sang on every green spray
{And the larks they sang melodious at the dawning of the day,

{Together}
And the larks they sang melodious,
And the larks they sang melodious,
And the larks they sang melodious,
at the dawning of the day.

Now a sailor and his true love were a-walking one day.
Said the sailor to his true love, “I am bound far away.
I'm bound for the East Indies where the loud cannons roar
{I must go and leave you Nancy, you're the girl that I adore,}

{Together}
I must go and leave you Nancy,
I must go and leave you Nancy,
I must go and leave you Nancy,
you're the girl that I adore.

Well the ring from off her finger she instantly drew,
Saying, “Take this, dearest William, and my heart will go too.”
And as they were embracing tears from her eyes fell,
{Saying, “May I go along with you?”, “Oh no, my love, farewell,”}

{Together}
Saying, “May I go along with you?”
Saying, “May I go along with you?”
Saying, “May I go along with you?”
“Oh no, my love, farewell,”

“Fare thee well my dearest Nancy, no longer can I stay,
For the topsails are hoisted and the anchor's aweigh,
And the ship she lies waiting for the fast flowing tide,
{And if ever I return again, I will make you my bride,}

{Together}
And if ever I return again,
And if ever I return again,
And if ever I return again,
I will make you my bride.

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