The Longest Song Wiki
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[[Category:JD Songs]]

Latest revision as of 06:04, 15 October 2019

This traditionally bawdy capstan shanty originates from the late 19th century and also travels under the names A Rovin' and Plymouth Town. Folklore suggests there are versions of the song which date back to the late 17th century- though little evidence exists to offer substantive proof.

The Longest Johns tend toward somewhat more subtle versions of the tune, and the version sung on their live streams certainly leave out a majority of the debauchery and possible consequences thereof.

JD generally leads this tune.

Comedic verses the band has suggested substituting include:

"I put my arms around her dad...and he was very very glad"--Robbie

"I put my hands around her spine...I pulled it out and said, that's mine."--Robbie (though questionably attributed to Josh Bowker)

Lyrics

These lyrics are based on the version sung by the Longest Johns in their August 2019 Livestream.

In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
{Mark well what I do say,}
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
and she was mistress of her trade.
{I'll go no more a-roving with you, fair maid.}

{Chorus}
A-roving, a-roving, since roving's been my ru-I-in,
I'll go no more a-roving with you, fair maid.

I asked this maid out for a walk,
{Mark well what I do say,}
I asked this maid out for a walk,
That we might have some private talk.
{I'll go no more a-roving with you, fair maid.}

{Chorus}

Then a great big Dutchman rammed my bow,
{Mark well what I do say,}
Then a great big Dutchman rammed my bow,
And said, "Young man! zis izt mein frau!"

So take this warning boys from me,
{Mark well what I do say,}
So take this warning boys from me,
With other men's wives don't make too free.
{I'll go no more a-roving with you, fair maid.}

{Chorus til end}